Join Crow Canyon for Cultural Explorations of Southwest, Baja California

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Spots are filling up fast for the final Cultural Explorations travel seminars of 2018, and you definitely don’t want to miss out on these incredible opportunities to explore the West like never before!

Kayenta and Hohokam Connections (October 23-29) is a seven-day trip that follows the path of the ancestral Kayenta people on their journey from northern Arizona’s Mogollon Rim southward through the rugged landscape to the valleys of what are today Phoenix and Tucson. Along the way, you’ll explore the great houses and petroglyph panels at Homol’ovi State Park, the nearly 8,000 year-old petroglyphs on the canyon walls above Chevelon Creek, the 600-room Mogollon great house at Kinishba Ruins, and the Hohokam’s distinctive caliche construction at Casa Grande Ruins National Monument.

Along the way you’ll be enjoying great accommodations, including a night at the historic La Posada Hotel in Winslow and two nights at the beautiful Lodge on the Desert in Tucson.

The primary scholars for this trip are:

Douglas Craig, Ph.D.—Douglas is an archaeologist with more than 30 years’ experience studying the ancient cultures of southern Arizona. As a principal investigator at Northland Research, he has directed large-scale excavations across the Hohokam region, including in the Phoenix, Tucson, and Tonto basins. His interests include the political ecology of ancient southwestern communities, with a focus on Hohokam household and community organization.

Angela Garcia-Lewis (Akimel O’Odham, Gila River Indian Community)—Angela is the Cultural Preservation Compliance Supervisor for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, where she has worked for the past eight years conducting cultural resource consultation under NAGPRA, Section 106, and other mandates. In addition, she provides traditional cultural consultation on projects ranging from cultural interpretation to legislation. She is also a traditional O’Odham singer and is active in cultural revitalization.

Baja Rock Art (November 6-15) is an eight-day exploration of the thousands of incredible and brilliant paintings of humans, animals, and unique forms that are preserved in caves and natural shelters near the coast along Mexico’s Baja peninsula. The culture that lived here remains a mystery to the archaeological world, but ancient sites reveal how the culture may have adapted to the diverse Baja landscapes, and rock art provides clues to their seasonal ceremonies.

On this trip you’ll learn about the area’s ancient cultural connections to the American Southwest through visits to cave-painting sites, historic missions, and museums. You’ll also enjoy Baja’s temperate weather and famous beaches, along with delicious food and top-notch accommodations!

The primary scholar for this trip is Jerry D. Moore, Ph.D. Jerry is a professor of anthropology at California State University, Dominguez Hills. His research focuses on the archaeology of cultural landscapes in Peru and Baja California. His archaeological fieldwork has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Geographic Society, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the Center for Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks, and other agencies and foundations. Jerry is also the author of numerous books, articles, book chapters, and reviews. He has also been a fellow at Dumbarton Oaks (1992-93, 2017), the Sainsbury Centre for the Arts, University of East Anglia (1994), the Getty Research Institute (2001-2002), and the Institute of Advanced Study, Durham University (2013).

For more information about these trips—including complete itineraries—click here or call 1-800-422-8975, ext. 457 to talk to one of our enrollment specialists.

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